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1918 Nash Quad

Left front quarter view of Nash Quad truck

The Nash Quad was first manufactured in 1914 by the Thomas B. Jeffrey Company, which was located in Kenosha, Wisconsin. It became quite popular during World War I and was used by the armed forces of not only the United States, but also Russia, France and Britain. One of the first motor vehicles to offer four-wheel drive, the Quad proved very suitable to the rough, unpaved roads of the time. In 1916, Jeffrey sold the production rights to the Nash company. Because of its popularity, it was produced in large numbers, including license production by Hudson, National, and Paige-Detroit. Exact numbers aren't known, but apparently over 11,000 were produced in 1918 alone.


The Quad driving by

Ammunition body waiting restoration

The PFM's Quad is on loan from Jeff Cromeen of Dallas, Texas. One of the conditions of the loan is that PFM re-restore it, and also restore the ammunition body to go with it. Currently we have it in running condition as a flatbed truck. The ammunition body, shown here, needs some work before we can fit it to the Quad.


Quad drive axle

The drive train is a bit unusual by modern standards, but was not uncommon in 1914. The wheel axles are only used to support the wheels, not to drive them. The Quad has separate driveshafts mounted above the main axles, through a universal joint at the wheel, and ending in a spur gear which drives a ring gear located about halfway out from the hub on the wheels. The tires are solid rubber. The truck is driven by a Buda H-U four-cylinder engine of 312 cubic inches, developing 28.9 horspower, through a four-speed transmission. This combination produced a top speed of 15 MPH. This Quad is a model 4017-L, which is one of two models offered (out of three total) that had four-wheel steering.

More Information

Here's a story about what it's like to drive the Nash Quad. The Four-Wheel-Drive Online site also has an article on the Jeffrey Quad, predecessor to the Nash.